Mommypotamus 2016-08-26T10:32:03Z http://www.mommypotamus.com/feed/atom/ WordPress http://cdn.mommypotamus.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/03/cropped-MP-logo-purple-32x32.png Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[Cheesy BLT Bites]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47927 2016-08-25T13:37:23Z 2016-08-25T13:37:08Z Note from Mommypotamus: I’m always on the lookout for healthy snack ideas, which is why I’m so excited about this guest recipe from Kristen of Rethink Simple. They look scrumptious, don’t they? Thanks Kristen! This summer I’ve been overwhelmed with tomatoes of all shapes and sizes. Many have been preserved as sauces for winter use, but I also try to incorporate […]

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blt-stuffed-cherry-tomatoesNote from Mommypotamus: I’m always on the lookout for healthy snack ideas, which is why I’m so excited about this guest recipe from Kristen of Rethink Simple. They look scrumptious, don’t they? Thanks Kristen!

This summer I’ve been overwhelmed with tomatoes of all shapes and sizes. Many have been preserved as sauces for winter use, but I also try to incorporate them fresh whenever possible. Salad is a no brainer, but over the past few years I’ve always found myself with an abundance of sweet cherry tomatoes and not enough ways to use them. Until we made these.

As I’m sure you all know, a standard BLT (bacon, lettuce, tomato) is a sandwich made up of 5 main ingredients: bacon, lettuce, tomato, mayonnaise and bread. Drop the bread, swap the mayo for cream cheese, add a few finishing ingredients, stuff them inside of a cherry tomato and voila! You’ve got these BLT-style stuffed cherry tomatoes that are sure to be a hit!

blt-style-stuffed-cherry-tomatoes

Cheesy BLT Bites
 
Author:
Recipe type: Snacks
Ingredients
  • 20 cherry tomatoes (the bigger the better)
  • 8 pieces of bacon, cooked and crumbled
  • ½ cup cream cheese (full­fat)
  • 2 tbsp finely chopped spinach
  • 1½ tbsp grated parmesan cheese
  • dash of sea salt
Instructions
  1. Sit tomatoes on your cutting board. Cherry tomatoes will sit flat when placed top down (where they were attached to the stem faces your countertop). Once they are all sitting flat, slice a sliver off the top.
  2. Scoop out the pulp and seeds and set aside. You can discard or use for making salsa, pasta sauce, etc. I used my 1⁄4 tsp measuring cup to easily scoop out the pulp. A regular spoon was much too big for the job.
  3. In a bowl, combine the remaining ingredients and mix. Spoon the filling into each tomato (again I used my 1⁄4 tsp measuring cup). To crumble the bacon I placed the cooked strips in unbleached parchment paper and crumpled it with my hand. Keep refrigerated, serve and enjoy!

 

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[Rhodiola Benefits and Uses]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=42130 2016-08-24T02:49:36Z 2016-08-24T02:45:56Z (((Happy sigh))) Over the past week I’ve jumped through rolling waves, captured ghost crabs under starlight, crossed something off my bucket list, and watched with joy as my littles gifted their alligator floaty and sand toys to another family with three littles on our last day. I’ve also “watched this” fourteen thousand times, rolled out of bed three […]

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rhodiola-benefits

(((Happy sigh))) Over the past week I’ve jumped through rolling waves, captured ghost crabs under starlight, crossed something off my bucket list, and watched with joy as my littles gifted their alligator floaty and sand toys to another family with three littles on our last day. I’ve also “watched this” fourteen thousand times, rolled out of bed three hours before I wanted to, diffused toddler meltdowns, and tried to meet the needs and desires of five people at once. Sometimes life requires a lot of stamina – even on vacation! If that sounds familiar, read on.

As I mentioned here, whether it’s a sleepless night, illness, surgery, stress at work, meltdowns at the store with a toddler, financial pressure, or just a go-go-go season of life, we all go through times that require a lot of us. Ideally, we are able to rest between these experiences so our adrenals can recover – similar to the way muscles do after a workout. In real life, that doesn’t always happen.

One of my favorite ways to support the adrenals through challenging times is with adaptogens – herbs that help the body adapt to stress. I’ve written a beginner’s guide to them here, and in this post I’m going to cover the benefits of one of the most popular adaptogenic herbs – rhodiola rosea – along with safety info for pregnant and breastfeeding mamas.

What is rhodiola?

Before it was a staple of Russian astronauts and athletes, rhodiola rosea was a favorite of the Vikings, “who used it to enhance mental and physical endurance.” (source) It thrives in high altitude, low oxygen conditions with extreme cold (think Arctic circle) and intense UV light exposure, and many people believe its ability to adapt to such harsh conditions is what makes it beneficial to us.

Rhodiola’s popularity spans many cultures – it was mentioned by the ancient Greek physician Dioscorides,  “included in the first Swedish pharmacopoeia in 1755,” and given as a bouquet of roots in Siberia to “couples prior to marriage to enhance fertility and assure the birth of healthy children.” (source, 192)

Actually, it is still given as a bouquet in that region to this day!

Also known as rose root, rhodiola smells similar to a common rose but is actually a member of a different plant family, crassulacae.

Rhodiola rosea benefits

This adaptogen is considered helpful for:

  • Adapting to stressful experiences
  • Immune support
  • Memory and overall cognitive function
  • Energy and stamina
  • Elevating mood
  • Altitude sickness when used with cordyceps, reishi, and holy basil (details on how he recommends using it in this post)*

Unlike some “warming” adaptogens, rhodiola is considered a cooling herb. Because it is not likely to have over-stimulating effects, it is considered well-suited for type A personalities and those that want to “keep their cool” during stressful times. (source)

*This list was compiled based on the research discussed in Adaptogens in Medical Herbalism by clinical herbalist Donald Yance and Adaptogens: Herbs For Strength, Stamina and Stress Relief by ethnobotanist David Winston and herbal expert Steven Maimes.

rhodiola

Is rhodiola safe during pregnancy and breastfeeding?

Unfortunately, no reliable information is available about the safety of rhodiola for pregnant/breastfeeding moms, so avoidance is recommended. Although opinions vary on whether adaptogens are appropriate for pregnant/breastfeeding women, some have a long history of use during pregnancy/breastfeeding in traditional cultures. For example, maca is a staple in the diet of pregnant and nursing Peruvian women, where it is believed to support fertility along with the health of mothers and their babies. (source 1, source 2,  source 3)

Other herbs – such as eleuthero and Panax ginseng – were recently classified as “safe herbals” for pregnancy in a multinational study that examined herbal products taken by expecting women (source). But again, opinions vary on this subject and some practitioners advise against using adaptogens due to a lack of formal research.

  • Regarding the general use of herbs – not just adaptogens – midwives I have spoken with usually recommend avoidance in the first trimester unless:
    The herb is needed to support the woman through a particular issue, like nausea.
    The herb has a record of safety during pregnancy when used appropriately and the woman is taking it under the supervision of a qualified professional.
    Please seek the input of a qualified healthcare practitioner before introducing any new herb.

How much is recommended?

In Adaptogens In Medical Herbalism, Donald Yance, CN, MH, RH(AHG) writes that he does “not recommend this herb as a single herb; it is extremely astringent and drying and is best used along with other adaptogens in mixed formulas in a range of 10 to 20 percent of the overall.” (Medical Herbalism, 552)

According to Yance, rhodiola extracts sold in the U.S. often lack desirable levels of the active constituents that are being sought. Even more concerning he adds that some manufacturers add synthetic forms of those constituents to bring their products within the desired target range. For that reason, he recommends purchasing wild Russian 1:1 rhodiola extract, then using “2 to 5 ml daily as part of an adaptogenic formula that includes other adaptogens.” (Medical Herbalism, 552) Because wild Russian (Siberian) liquid extract is very expensive, I’ve included a couple of additional options below. (One is this wild extract in capsule form, which is harvested from the Russian arctic circle.)

Since adaptogens are herbs rather than pharmaceutical drugs, there are no “dosages.” However, herbalists do share knowledge about what methods of consumption seem to produce a beneficial effect for most people.

In Adaptogens: Herbs for Strength, Stamina and Stress Relief, ethnobotanist David Winston and herbal expert Steven Maimes recommend the following additional forms:
As a decoction – Simmer 1-2 teaspoons dried root in 8-10 ounces water for 15 minutes, then cover and let steep for an additional 45 minutes. Drink one to three cups per day.
Capsules – Two to four capsules of standardized extract (3-5% rosavins and 1% salidroside) per day.

What else do I need to know?

Rhodiola should be avoided in “patients who are bipolar, manic, or paranoid. It can cause insomnia in sensitive people.” (Adaptogens: Herbs For Strength, Stamina and Stress Relief, 194) And as always, please seek the input of a qualified healthcare practitioner before introducing any new herb.

Oh, and you may find this post helpful: 15 Ways To Be Kind To Your Adrenals

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[Lemon Poppyseed Muffins (Gluten-Free)]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=48150 2016-08-18T15:10:54Z 2016-08-18T14:51:05Z Moist and cakey, these lemon poppyseed muffins are like sweet little bursts of sunshine on a stay-in-your-pajamas rainy day . . . or a pop-out-of-bed and hit the road early day . . . or any day, really. Like my five-minute ketchup, super simple cauliflower crust, and homemade chicken nuggets, they’re easy enough to whip up […]

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lemon-poppyseed-muffins-recipe

Moist and cakey, these lemon poppyseed muffins are like sweet little bursts of sunshine on a stay-in-your-pajamas rainy day . . . or a pop-out-of-bed and hit the road early day . . . or any day, really. Like my five-minute ketchup, super simple cauliflower crust, and homemade chicken nuggets, they’re easy enough to whip up while simultaneously discussing how many eyelids camels have (three) and whether or not all birds can fly (nope). 

And of course, we’re using only real ingredients – not the partially hydrogenated oil, modified food starch, yellow number 5, and other stuff you’ll find on store shelves. I hope you love this recipe as much as we do!

lemon-poppyseed-muffins-gluten-free-paleo

5.0 from 2 reviews
Lemon Poppyseed Muffins (Gluten-Free, Paleo)
 
Makes 9 muffins in a standard muffin pan
Author:
Ingredients
  • 2 cups almond flour
  • 2 tablespoons coconut flour
  • 5 large eggs
  • ½ cup honey
  • 2 teaspoons sucanat
  • ¾ teaspoon vanilla
  • 2 teaspoons lemon extract
  • ½ teaspoon sea salt
  • zest of one lemon (about 2 teaspoons)
  • 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon poppy seeds
  • ¾ teaspoon baking soda
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 350F. Grease nine muffin cups with butter or coconut oil. If desired pop some parchment paper muffin liners in as well.
  2. Set aside 2 teaspoons of almond flour. In a mixing bowl, combine the remaining almond flour with the coconut flour, salt, poppyseeds and baking soda.
  3. In a separate bowl, whisk together the eggs, honey, vanilla, lemon extract, and lemon zest. Add the flour to the egg mixture, then pour batter into muffin cups. Combine sucanat with almond flour and sprinkle over the top of the muffins. Bake for about 20 minutes - the tops should be springy yet firm when they're ready. Allow to cool for about 10 minutes before removing from the muffin pan.

 

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[How To Get Rid Of Heartburn Naturally]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47959 2016-08-16T15:56:47Z 2016-08-16T15:45:52Z The sky is blue, racecar spelled backwards is still racecar, and in most cases heartburn is caused by low stomach acid, not high. Yes, seriously. After testing thousands of heartburn patients at his Tahoma Clinic, Jonathan Wright, M.D., concluded that excess stomach acid is not the problem in over 90% of cases. (source) Last week […]

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how-to-get-rid-of-heartburn

The sky is blue, racecar spelled backwards is still racecar, and in most cases heartburn is caused by low stomach acid, not high. Yes, seriously. After testing thousands of heartburn patients at his Tahoma Clinic, Jonathan Wright, M.D., concluded that excess stomach acid is not the problem in over 90% of cases. (source)

Last week I covered what he (and many others) say is the most common cause of heartburn, plus how acid blocking drugs can:

  • Decrease our ability to resist infections
  • Cause nutritional deficiencies
  • And even increase our risk of certain diseases.

Fortunately, according to Dr. Wright, “In cases of mild to moderate heartburn, ‘acid indigestion,’ bloating, and gas, actual testing for stomach acid production at Tahoma Clinic shows that hypochlorhydria (too little acid production) occurs in over 90 percent of thousands tested since 1976. In these cases, a “natural strategy” is almost always successful.” (source)

As always,  I want to remind you that I am not a doctor and this is not medical advice or a diagnosis. I’m just a former heartburn sufferer passing along information from experts that I’ve found helpful.  Okay, let’s jump in!

How To Get Rid Of Heartburn Naturally

# 1: Remove dietary triggers

You probably already know a few foods that trigger heartburn for you – coffee, citrus, alcohol, onions, spicy foods. etc. Some foods, like carbonated drinks, may increase intra-abdominal pressure and push on the LES, which as we discussed in my previous post is the valve that protects the esophagus from stomach acid.

However, some triggers may not be quite as obvious. In this article, Chris Kresser LAc. explains why carbohydrates and fiber may contribute to some cases of heartburn, then discusses the potential benefits of temporarily reducing carbohydrate and fiber intake.

Other foods don’t weaken the LES, but are thought to directly irritate the esophagus. In general, it is recommended that known irritants be avoided for at least awhile. Some people say forever, but I personally reintroduced many of my “triggers” with no problem after I started feeling better.

Also, according to Dr. Wright, certain drugs – aspirin and ibuprofen, for example – are considered esophageal irritants, while others may weaken the LES.

#2: Increase stomach acid levels

If “this sounds like throwing gasoline on smoldering embers, that’s right, it does sound like it, but in fact it’s not,” says Dr. Wright. (Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You)

He adds that, “Not only does this strategy work to eliminate heartburn and GERD, it often goes a long way toward restoring and nutrient deficiencies and repairing the gastric bacterial barrier, not to mention the intestinal barrier.” (Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You)

Apple Cider Vinegar or Lemon Juice

One of the easiest ways to increase stomach acid levels is to drink a little apple cider vinegar or lemon juice right before a meal. Both are traditional folk remedies for indigestion, most likely due to their acid content and the presence of enzymes that support digestion. (Pasteurized apple cider vinegar does not contain live enzymes, but raw apple cider vinegar does.)

One thing to be aware of, however, is that according to Dr. Wright, “gradually increasing quantities of lemon juice (citric acid) or vinegar (acetic acid) will often relieve some or even all symptoms. This is supported by the common practice in some cultures of treating gastric discomfort with lemon juice or vinegar. Unfortunately, even though symptoms may be improved, actual nutrient digestion and assimilation are not improved nearly as much as with HCL” He’s talking about hydrochloric acid, which we’ll cover later in this post.

To Use: Most often, individuals add 1-2 teaspoons apple cider vinegar or lemon juice to a little water and drink just before meals. If needed, the amount is gradually increased until the individual determines the optimal amount for their body.

how-to-get-rid-of-heartburn-natural-remedies

Digestive Bitters

According to Katy Haldiman, MS, RN, “Another great option for increasing stomach acidity are digestive bitters, which can be found in most health food stores. Digestive bitters tap into the body’s neuro-lingual response that occurs when you taste something bitter. The bitter taste stimulates increased stomach acid production, as well as other digestive juices.” (source)

To Use: Follow the instructions on the label.

Using Digestive Bitters Safely During Pregnancy

Most digestive bitters contain angelica & gentian, which should be avoided during pregnancy. However, Urban Moonshine has created a version of digestive bitters that is free of those herbs and is considered helpful for occasional heartburn and morning sickness.

For individuals who are not pregnant, they have several other available flavors. You can see them all here.

HCL With Pepsin

Unlike digestive bitters, which stimulate the body’s own production of hydrochloric acid, HCL is actual hydrochloric acid. It is most often paired with Pepsin, because a deficiency in one usually signals a deficiency in the other.

It’s really best to work with a knowledgeable practitioner when supplementing HCL with Pepsin. However, if you’re interested in doing a brief trial on your own, Chris Kresser LAc. has put together some suggested guidelines here.

Two important things to keep in mind are:

1 – “Paradoxically, adverse symptoms are most likely to occur in individuals with the lowest levels of stomach acid. This is because these people are the most likely to have atrophic gastritis (a thinned-out stomach lining), which makes them much more sensitive to even smaller quantities of HCL than a normal, thicker stomach lining.” (source)

2- “HCL should never be taken by anyone who is also using any kind of anti-inflammatory medication such as corticosteroids (e.g. Prednisone), aspirin, Indocin, ibuprofen (e.g. Motrin, Advil), or other NSAIDs. These drugs can initiate damage to the GI lining that supplemental HCL might aggravate, increasing the risk of gastric bleeding or ulcer.” (source)

#3: Support Healthy Digestion

In the 30 Day Heartburn Solution, Craig Fear LAc. recommends focusing on gut healing before even considering supplementation with apple cider vinegar, bitters, or HCL. Personally, I opted to incorporate all three strategies at ones: removing triggers, slowly raising stomach acid levels, and supporting optimal digestion using gut healing foods.

For gut care, I’m a huge fan of homemade bone broth, grass-fed gelatin, fermented foods like water kefir, kombucha, and beet kvass, and probiotics.

Interestingly, Chris Kresser LAc. recommends against probiotics that primarily produce D-lactate for individuals who might have small intestinal bacterial overgrowth, which is sometimes present with GERD/heartburn symptoms. I have written about before about why D-lactate containing probiotics may be problematic for some people, and I why I opt for L-lactate forming options instead (like this one) and soil-based probiotics (like this one.)

In addition, digestive enzymes may also be helpful. According to Dr. Wright, “In order to more closely simulate the natural process, it is best to take pancreatic enzymes at the end of a meal. (I know that the bottle labels usually state the opposite. I don’t agree!) Taking digestive enzymes after meals gives the food adequate time to undergo the ‘acid phase’ of digestion, as happens with normal digestive function.” (Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You)

What about H. Pylori?

As mentioned in my previous post, an overgrowth of certain organisms such as candida and H. pylori can lower stomach acid levels. Somewhere between 1/3 and 2/3 of the human population carries H. pylori – many times without any symptoms at all. (source) When acquired early in life, research suggests that h. pylori may actually be protective against allergies and asthma. (source) On the other hand, it also has a causative relationship with ulcers and gastric cancer.

So is H. pylori good or bad? In this talk, Chris Kresser LAc describes it as a somewhat neutral bacteria which may have benefits for some people (usually when acquired early in life) and downsides for others (especially when acquired later). 

Normally, adequate levels of stomach acid will keep H. pylori levels in check. However, if acid levels dip for any reason (stress, medications, etc.), H. pylori may use that opportunity to grow out of control. To protect itself from being killed, H. pylori secretes an enzyme called urease which neutralizes hydrochloric acid. If H. pylori is present in significant quantities, it can release a substantial amount of urease and further lower stomach acid, creating a nice, cozy Hotel H. Pylori in the process.

When overgrowth is an issue, most practitioners recommend dealing directly with H. pylori in addition to other lifestyle changes. The conventional treatment is a mixture of heavy duty antibiotics with acid blockers. The idea is the the antibiotics will kill the H. pylori while the acid blockers lower acid levels so that the irritated stomach lining can heal. Unfortunately, antibiotic use can actually lead to more gut infections, and the success rate of this method is falling.

According to my friend Sylvie, who opted for a natural approach after being diagnosed with H. pylori, the usual treatment protocol now “fails for about 35% of patients – and the effectiveness is still falling. The reason is because bacteria has become resistant to antibiotics.”

In this article she outlines the natural strategy she used and shares her actual before/after lab results.

What if I’m currently taking an antacid?

Obviously you’ll want to talk to your healthcare provider about any changes you want to make (see my disclaimer above). However, according to Dr. Wright’s book section on “Weaning Yourself off Antacids and Acid Blockers,” he writes:

Since there is no ‘withdrawal’ from acid blockers or antacids, it is safe to just stop them and switch to natural alternatives, as long as symptoms are controlled. In cases of mild-to-moderate indigestion or heartburn, there’s usually no problem with switching. In more serious cases, particularly if there’s severe acid reflux with ongoing esophageal damage, it’s wisest to withdraw from acid blockers or antacids only in consultation with a knowledgeable physician.” (source)

Is pregnancy heartburn caused by low acid?

Possibly. However, there may be other factors that contribute to heartburn during pregnancy. According to Dr. Wright, sometimes it’s due to increased intra-abdominal pressure as everything shifts to accommodate baby. (source) In those cases, chiropractic care may be helpful.

Another possibility is that increased progesterone levels play a role. According to Raquel Dardik, M.D., clinical associate professor of gynecology at NYU Langone Medical Center, “Progesterone slows down contractions of the bowel, so it slows down how quickly food and gas move through. Everything slows down and backs up, so you feel bloated and constipated.”

If everything slows down, that means food may be staying in the stomach longer, potentially undergoing a little gas buildup. Another function of progesterone is to relax muscles, which may mean that it sometimes relaxes the LES (the muscle that keeps stomach acid out of the esophagus) a little too much.  Remember, as mentioned earlier, Urban Moonshine has created a version of digestive bitters that is free of those herbs and is considered helpful for occasional heartburn and morning sickness.

how-to-get-rid-of-heartburn-suggested-resources

Suggested Further Reading

Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You: Natural Relief from Heartburn, Indigestion, Reflux and GERD by Jonathan V. Wright, M.D. and Lane Lenard, Ph.D.

The 30 Day Heartburn Solution by Craig Fear LAc.

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[What Causes Heartburn?]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47939 2016-08-19T03:14:11Z 2016-08-11T15:52:15Z Here’s a fun little question for you – which of these statements is false? A) A Banyan Tree near Kolkata, India is larger than the average Walmart B) There are more nerve connections in your brain than there are stars in our galaxy C) Heartburn is usually due to too little stomach acid, not too much […]

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what-causes-heartburn

Here’s a fun little question for you – which of these statements is false?

A) A Banyan Tree near Kolkata, India is larger than the average Walmart
B) There are more nerve connections in your brain than there are stars in our galaxy
C) Heartburn is usually due to too little stomach acid, not too much

Okay, that was a trick question. They’re all true. The sources for the first two facts are here, and in this post we’ll dive into the clinical research that supports number three.

Now, maybe you’re thinking, “That can’t be right. I’ve taken an antacid when I had heartburn and it helped, so clearly the issue was too much acid.”

That’s certainly what I thought when I was one of the 60 million Americans struggling with heartburn. However, according to Jonathan Wright, M.D., author of Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You, the “Chances are very high – over 90 percent – that the real culprit is actually underproduction of stomach acid.”

So if antacids aren’t reducing excess acid, what are they actually doing? Unfortunately, there’s a downside to these medications – both over-the-counter and prescription – that you won’t find on the label.

Before we dive into the details, I want to remind you that I am not a doctor and this is not medical advice or a diagnosis. I’m just a former heartburn sufferer passing along information I’ve found helpful from respected physicians, clinical studies conducted by places like Johns Hopkins University, and articles from Scientific American and the New York Times. 

What we misunderstand about heartburn 

According to Dr. Wright, who has worked with thousands of heartburn patients at the Tahoma Clinic, “stomachs are built for the very purpose of containing and working with very strong acid, acid that is one-hundred-thousand times stronger than the acidity of our blood.”

This acid plays an essential role in helping us to break down food so that nutrients can be absorbed, and also kills a variety of bacteria, parasites, and other pathogens on contact. When levels are normal, you’re very unlikely to experience heartburn. However, if they’re low your chances increase. Here’s why:

heartburn-causes

Just above the stomach there is a valve called the lower esophageal sphincter (LES) – it protects the esophagus from harsh stomach acid. When the LES is functioning normally, it only opens when you eat, drink, belch, or (yep) vomit.

If the LES is working properly, it doesn’t matter how much acid we have on our stomachs. It’s not going to make it up to the esophagus. On the other hand, if the LES is asleep at the switch, even a small amount of acid could reflux into the esophagus under the right conditions. Scientists have found that when we have heartburn or GERD, the LES opens briefly when it’s not supposed to. If we’ve got acid – or anything else – in our stomachs, sometimes even a little bit, and it happens to be in the vicinity of the LES when it pops open inappropriately, we get reflux.” Jonathan Wright, M.D., Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You

So what causes the LES to malfunction? After testing the gastric pH of thousands of heartburn sufferers at his Tahoma Clinic, Dr. Wright has concluded that in 90%+ of cases it’s low stomach acid.

Remember, in addition to breaking down food so that nutrients can be absorbed, stomach acid also provides an “acid barrier” that kills bacteria, parasites, and other pathogens in our food. If the acid is too weak, maldigested food – especially carbohydrates – can become a source of nourishment for these bacteria/pathogens. As they feed, they produce fermentation byproducts (gases) that create pressure in the stomach and push on the LES valve. When the pressure builds, some acid may be pushed through the LES in to the esophagus, causing heartburn.

causes-of-heartburn

If you’re still not convinced, consider this: Studies show that our stomach acid levels tend to drop as we age. (source 1, source 2) “If heartburn were caused by too much stomach acid,” writes Chris Kresser, LAc., “we’d have a bunch of teenagers popping Rolaids instead of elderly folks. But of course that’s the opposite of what we see.”

That’s not to say teens can’t have low stomach acid – I actually got my first prescription for heartburn when I was nineteen. But on the whole, we tend to have more problems with heartburn as we get older despite dropping levels of stomach acid.

Dr. Wright’s “argument is with the mistaken concept that it takes ‘too much’ stomach acid to do the damage. Even a small amount of acid in the wrong place (such as the esophagus) can cause symptoms and ultimately tissue damage. (After all, we know that stomach acid is strong stuff, if it can help reduce a tough beefsteak into the equivalent of beef soup in an hour or so.)” (Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You)

What causes low stomach acid?

There are several possibilities:

  • Stress, particularly the chronic type, can inhibit the body’s secretion of hydrochloric acid (stomach acid). (source 1, source 2)
  • Certain gut infections, such as H. pylori and candida, reduce the body’s production of hydrochloric acid (source 1, source 2) It can be argued, however, that these infections only take hold if gastric acid secretion is already compromised. From that perspective, the presence of these microbes simply further inhibits the production of hydrochloric acid.
  • A mutation in one of the genes that influences gastric acid production (source)
  • Use of antacid medications

Acid reflux medications “not the benign drugs the public thinks they are” – Dr. Shoshana Herzig, Harvard Medical School

Most of us tend to think of heartburn medications as pills that just “take the edge off” and leave us with normal acid levels. Unfortunately, that’s not really the case. Not only do they reduce levels that may already be too low, sometimes they almost completely eliminate it.

The drug most commonly prescribed for heartburn today, Prilosec, virtually eliminates acid in the stomach around the clock, a fact that is proudly promoted in the drug’s widespread consumer-oriented advertising. Prevacid, Aciphex, Protonix and Nexium do about the same thing.” (Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You, emphasis mine)

Although eliminating stomach acid will relieve symptoms of indigestion, it also prevents the stomach from doing its job – digesting food and killing pathogens as they enter our system. “The most popular acid reflux medications — proton pump inhibitors like Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid, which are taken daily — can have serious side effects and ‘are not the benign drugs the public thinks they are,'” Dr. Shoshana J. Herzig of Harvard Medical School told The New York Times.

Some of the problems mentioned are decreased resistance to infection, nutritional deficiencies and increased risk of certain diseases.

what-causes-acid-reflux

Impaired Resistance To Infection

As we covered earlier, the stomach is supposed to be an “acid barrier” that protects against intestinal tract infection. Unfortunately, according to John Clarke, a gastroenterologist at Johns Hopkins Hospital in Baltimore, lowering stomach acid using proton-pump inhibitors like Nexium, Prilosec and Prevacid “leaves people vulnerable to nutritional deficiencies and infections, including food poisoning like salmonella, a serious, sometimes life-threatening digestive system infection called Clostridium difficile, and perhaps pneumonia.” (source)

Other studies have found individuals who take acid suppressing drugs have an increased risk of getting pneumonia. (source 1)

And because I couldn’t leave it out . . .

Here’s an extreme, but very revealing, incident: Decades ago, public health officials in India investigated why some people in a village in the midst of a cholera epidemic didn’t contract the disease, while others did. They found that more of those who stayed healthy had normal levels of stomach acid, while those that developed the disease usually did not. Apparently, the strong stomach acid killed the bacteria before it could ‘colonize’ (and damage) the entire gastrointestinal tract.” Why Stomach Acid Is Good For You

Decreased Nutrient Absorption

Stomach acid triggers a whole cascade of digestive processes, including the release of enzymes and bile to break down fats, proteins, etc.. Without this “acid trigger,” an individual may become malnourished due to a lack of absorption – even when they’re eating a very healthy diet.

If acid reducing drugs are taken on a long-term basis, it may lead to severe nutritional deficiencies. For example, the long-term use of proton pump inhibitors like Prilosec, Nexium and Prevacid may “lead to low levels of magnesium in the blood, which can precipitate seizures, arrhythmias and muscle spasms, according to the F.D.A.” (Source: The New York Times)

Increased Risk Of Certain Diseases

In this article, Chris Kresser, LAc discusses the association of low stomach acid with:

  • Stomach cancer
  • Allergies
  • Bronchial asthma
  • Depression, anxiety, mood disorders
  • Pernicious anemia
  • Skin diseases, including forms of acne, dermatitis, eczema, and urticaria
  • Gall bladder disease (gallstones)
  • Autoimmune diseases, such as Rheumatoid arthritis and Graves disease
  • Irritable bowel syndrome (IBS), Crohn’s disease (CD), Ulcerative colitis (UC)
  • Chronic hepatitis
  • Osteoporosis
  • Type 1 diabetes

Recent news articles have also reported on links between acid reducing drugs and other problems:

Scientific American: Heartburn Meds Alter The Gut

The New York Times: Heartburn Drugs Tied to Dementia Risk

The New York Times: Taking Heartburn Medications Long-Term (Discusses bone fractures, seizures, arrhythmias & potentially life-threatening intestinal infections)

Washington Post: Popular heartburn medication linked to chronic kidney disease

Stanford Medicine: Some heartburn drugs may boost risk of heart attack, study finds

Science News: Heartburn drugs can damage cells that line blood vessels

We've all heard that heartburn is caused by excess stomach acid. But what if that's not true in over 90% of cases? After testing thousands of heartburn patients at his Tahoma Clinic, that's what Jonathan Wright, M.D. concluded. Here's what he says is the most common cause of heartburn, plus how antacids often work against us . . .

A Natural Approach To Heartburn

Since low hydrochloric acid levels are the main cause of heartburn, most people find that raising acid levels helps significantly.  Using that approach I’ve been heartburn-free for well over ten years now, and I’m able to enjoy all my favorite foods. In fact, I’m eating homemade pizza doused in red chili flakes and pepperoncini’s right now, and yesterday I ate eggs slathered in my favorite store-bought habanero sauce.

In this post on getting rid of heartburn naturally, we’ll discuss several strategies for lowering stomach pH (making it more acidic), improving digestion, and supporting nutrient absorption. Don’t miss it! Sign up for my newsletter below and I’ll send it to your inbox.

Continue Reading...What Causes Heartburn?

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[Zucchini Pizza Crust Recipe]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47849 2016-08-09T16:21:34Z 2016-08-09T14:36:09Z “The trouble is, you cannot grow just one zucchini. Minutes after you plant a single seed, hundreds of zucchini will barge out of the ground and sprawl around the garden, menacing the other vegetables. At night, you will be able to hear the ground quake as more and more zucchinis erupt.” – Dave Barry There […]

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zucchini-pizza-crust-recipe

The trouble is, you cannot grow just one zucchini. Minutes after you plant a single seed, hundreds of zucchini will barge out of the ground and sprawl around the garden, menacing the other vegetables. At night, you will be able to hear the ground quake as more and more zucchinis erupt.” – Dave Barry

There is a situation in my garden – one I didn’t really think was possible given my track record with plants. (I once killed a cactus named Frank. A CACTUS.)

Anyway, back to the situation: Stuff is growing everywhere. It’s been a challenge to figure out how to use the buckets of cucumbers we just harvested (thanks for your tips!), but when it comes to summer squashes like zephyr and zucchini, I know just what to do.

We’re talking zucchini pasta carbonara and shish kabobs and soup and breakfast fritters. And of course, PIZZA. This recipe is very similar to my cauliflower pizza crust, but the ratios have been adjusted to account for the extra moisture present in squash. It’s the perfect way to use up extra zucchini, just ask my kids. 🙂

zucchini-pizza-crust

5.0 from 1 reviews
Zucchini Pizza Crust Recipe
 
Zucchini Pizza Crust Recipe
Author:
Ingredients
Instructions
  1. Place a large baking sheet in the oven and preheat to 450F
  2. Grind zucchini in food processor with salt, onion powder, coconut flour, cassava flour, cheese, and eggs.
  3. Using a silicone spatula, spread the mixture into the shape of a pizza crust on parchment paper. The crust should be 9-10 inches wide - any bigger and it will be challenging to flip. I like to make the edges a little thicker so that it looks like a traditional crust.
  4. Slide heated baking sheet under the parchment paper and place crust in the oven. Bake for about 15 minutes.
  5. Remove crust from oven and place a sheet of parchment paper over the top. With oven mitts on both hands, pull the parchment paper the crust is resting on toward you. It should be slightly off the baking sheet. Place one hand underneath the crust and one hand on top, then flip the crust and place it back on the baking sheet.
  6. Place the baking sheet back in the oven and bake for about 10 more minutes.
  7. Remove the crust from the oven and add toppings. Switch your settings from Bake to Broil and remove the pizza when the pizza is melted.

 

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[DIY Hydrating Skin Repair Serum]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47814 2016-08-08T14:25:46Z 2016-08-05T15:23:13Z “Be your own kind of beautiful” <- I’d never heard those exact words until a few years ago, but thanks to my mom I’ve seen them lived all my life. So, I am beautiful when I’m laughing till I cry with my toddler . . . even when I haven’t showered in two days. And […]

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face-serum-recipe

Be your own kind of beautiful” <- I’d never heard those exact words until a few years ago, but thanks to my mom I’ve seen them lived all my life.

So, I am beautiful when I’m laughing till I cry with my toddler . . . even when I haven’t showered in two days. And I am beautiful when I’m crying with my eight-year-old over the last chapter of Anne of Green Gables, or (yes I’m admitting it) a sappy commercial, mascara smears and all. Fyi, it’s never the pharmaceutical commercials. Those get an entirely different response.

Where was I?  Oh right, before I share an amazing face serum recipe with you that promotes collagen production, hydrates and plumps skin, helps to even skin tone and fade brown spots, supports scar healing, soothes eczema and psoriasis, and makes skin glow, let’s just get one thing out of the way.

You are beautiful.

Yes, this is really good stuff, but I am so over ads telling us we need x,y, or z to feel beautiful, so I wanted to clear that one thing up before we jump in. I hope you love this serum as much as I do, and that it makes you feel like the best version of yourself: radiant and youthful.  Ready now? Good.

This two-ingredient recipe is so easy to make, and because it’s a “dry” oil that absorbs easily, it’s ideal for both morning application (before makeup if you’re putting some on) and in the evening before diving into bed. Here’s what it contains:

Ingredient #1: Rosehip Seed Oil

Cold-pressed from the seeds of a wild forest rose found mostly in Chile, rosehip seed oil has been shown in studies to support skin repair, elasticity and firmness. (source) It also helps even out skin tone, particularly brown spots, say researchers from the University of San Marcos (source) This is probably no surprise to locals in the Chilean Andes mountains, who have long regarded it as a healing oil.

So what makes rosehip seed oil so exceptional?

The short version: It promotes collagen production, hydrates and plumps skin, helps to even skin tone and fade brown spots, supports scar healing (including stretch marks), and soothes eczema and psoriasis.

The long version: It contains trans-retinoic acid, which is a derivative of vitamin A. If you’re not familiar with the benefits of topical vitamin A for skin, one worth mentioning is that it stimulates collagen production. (source) So yeah, it’s kind of important.

Although synthetic vitamin A (in the form of retinol, retinyl palmitate, etc.) is sometimes touted as an “anti-aging miracle worker,” I don’t consider it a good option for many reasons. Before we get into the details, I just want to say that I don’t personally embrace the term anti-aging. I am pro feeling beautiful at every age! For me, part of that means taking care of myself inside and out. 

Okay, back to the problems with synthetic vitamin A. First, it often comes with side effects like burning, redness, itching and peeling. Second, according to The Environmental Working Group, a US government study recently found that a synthetic form of vitamin A – retinyl palmitate – may actually accelerate free radical damage when applied to the skin.

In contrast, the natural vitamin A derivative found in rosehip seed oil comes with complementary cofactors that prevent it from being irritating – quite the opposite, actually! Rosehip seed oil is so gentle it’s considered appropriate for all skin types, even acne prone and very sensitive skin, and it’s often used to support healing for sun damaged skin. (source)

Why the difference? According to Dr. Campbell McBride, author of Gut & Psychology Syndrome, the body “has been designed to use natural forms of these nutrients and often does not recognize the synthetic forms and does not know what to do with them. There is a growing suspicion that a lot of cases of kidney stones, for example, are caused by supplementing synthetic forms of vitamin C, which would represent most vitamin C supplements available in the shops.” (p. 296).

Now back to those cofactors I mentioned earlier: Rosehip seed oil is incredibly rich in essential fatty acids. Over 70% of the oil is comprised of two in particular – linoleic and linolenic acid – which improve hydration and skin elasticity. (source)

It also contains a significant amount of vitamin C, which is essential for collagen synthesis. (source)

To recap, these vitamins and and nutrients work synergistically to:

  • Support scar healing (including stretch marks)
  • Promote the production of collagen
  • Help skin maintain moisture and plumpness
  • Even skin tone, particularly brown spots
  • Soothe eczema and psoriasis

Ingredient #2: Essential Oils

For this recipe I’ve selected oils that support skin repair and renewal, elasticity and firmness, and even skin tone. Some, such as helichrysum italicum, carrot seed, geranium, frankincense, rosewood and myrrh are also considered helpfu for scars.

homemade-diy-skin-serum

DIY Hydrating Face Serum Recipe

In general a 1% dilution (6 drops for this recipe) is recommended for face application. However, it may be appropriate to go up to 2% (12 drops) if certain objectives – like softening fine lines – are desired.

Also, quick note: I added some rose and calendula to my bottle to make it pretty. Both are wonderful for skin but totally optional.

Ingredients

Two pre-made blends that would also work beautifully are Anti-Age (which smells amazing) and Soft Skin.

*Avoid this essential oil if pregnant or nursing. For a longer list of essential oils to avoid during pregnancy/breastfeeding click here, and for a list of oils that are considered safe for pregnancy/nursing click here.

To Make

Add rosehip seed oil and essential oil drops to a container – I prefer a measuring cup because the spout makes it easier to pour. Stir and transfer to a small, clean, airtight bottle. I use a 1 oz. glass bottle with treatment pump that I recycled, but you can find similar ones here and here.

To Use

Apply to your face and neck before bed. Because it is a dry oil that absorbs quickly, you can also apply it in the morning if desired.

Continue Reading...DIY Hydrating Skin Repair Serum

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[Watermelon Limeade Recipe]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47786 2016-08-02T01:53:08Z 2016-08-01T13:53:54Z Pretty soon life will be all about freshly-sharpened pencils, new packed-lunch ideas for our weekly homeschool meetup, and pumpkin spice lattes, but for now I’m savoring buckets of cucumbers and summer squash . . . splashing in the creek . . . . . . and of course the quintessential late summer fruit that is also a […]

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Watermelon Limeade Recipe

Pretty soon life will be all about freshly-sharpened pencils, new packed-lunch ideas for our weekly homeschool meetup, and pumpkin spice lattes, but for now I’m savoring buckets of cucumbers and summer squash . . .

bucket-of-cucumbers-limeade-recipe

splashing in the creek . . .

splashing-in-creek-limeade-recipe

. . . and of course the quintessential late summer fruit that is also a vegetable – the watermelon.

Now, I’m not really a fan of plain watermelon (I know, weird), but I absolutely adore sipping this limeade on a hot, sunny day. Sweet and tart and refreshing, it pairs beautifully with laughter, good conversation, and water of any kind – be it the sea, a pool, or a sprinkler.

Oh, and just like this ice cream, it has a grown-up option. Add in a little organic tequila for a smooth, yummy weekend treat. (Seriously, though, it’s amazing on its own. I tested the recipe with tequila because I thought you might ask, but I prefer mine without.)

Sweet and tart and refreshing, this watermelon limeade recipe pairs beautifully with laughter, good conversation, and water of any kind – be it the sea, a pool, or a sprinkler.

5.0 from 3 reviews
Watermelon Limeade Recipe
 
Author:
Ingredients
  • 4 cups cubed, de-seeded watermelon (should be about 2 cups after it is pureed)
  • ¾ cup lime juice
  • 2 tablespoons honey or maple syrup, or more to taste
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Pour over ice and serve.

honey-sweetened-limeade-recipe

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[Magnesium Oil Rub For Achy Legs]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47788 2016-08-09T19:11:14Z 2016-07-28T15:47:12Z So this thing is happening, and it aches and fills me with joy and makes me wish for a pause button at the same time. One minute I’m standing in a grocery store aisle nodding my head to a “those were the days” comment  – while mentally calculating how much longer I can shop before a […]

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Magnesium oil and essential oils for aching legs

So this thing is happening, and it aches and fills me with joy and makes me wish for a pause button at the same time. One minute I’m standing in a grocery store aisle nodding my head to a “those were the days” comment  – while mentally calculating how much longer I can shop before a toddlerpocalypse, of course – and the next I’m standing behind my eight-year-old as she zooms in to take this photo . . .

ks-no-bake-cookies

. . . for a project she’s working on. And my boys? They’re showering me with sweet toddler kisses and jedi-inspired hugs, and I’m doing my best to soak it all up. (While also trying not to sustain Lego-induced foot trauma, obviously. This is real life after all.)

So yeah, they’re growing up, and with that comes some not so fun territory. I’ve written about natural remedies for growing pains before, but today I wanted to share something that we’ve recently found helpful in addition to those suggestions. It’s a magnesium oil rub with essential oils that support muscle relaxation.

While there is no agreed upon cause of growing pains, one common theory is that it’s often due to the inability of ligaments and muscles to keep up with rapid bone growth.

As children are growing fairly rapidly, their muscles, tendons, and ligaments are growing as well,” says Jason Homme, MD, assistant professor of pediatrics at Mayo Clinic in Rochester, MN. Those body parts “may not be growing at the same pace, which can cause protesting a little bit.” (source)

My children’s pediatrician shares this view, and suggested magnesium as one of the things that may soothe aching legs.This recipe makes a wonderful bedtime rub for achy or restless legs, and it’s incredibly easy to make. Here’s a breakdown of what I used (and why):

Magnesium

There’s a reason magnesium is often called the magic mineral. As I mentioned in this post on science-backed tips for deeper, more restful sleep, it fuels about 300 biochemical reactions in the body. Some of those reactions help to relax achy muscles, mitigate the effects of stress, and calm the mind by supporting the production of the neurotransmitter GABA.

Magnesium deficiency is very common, and oral magnesium supplements are not always well-absorbed in the digestive tract. (source 1source 2) Fortunately, magnesium is well-absorbed through the skin.

Magnesium oil– which is not actually an oil but a mixture of magnesium chloride and water that feels oily to the touch – is perfect for this rub. Not only is it well-absorbed, it dries without any greasiness. If you do as much laundry as I do, I’m guessing the last thing you want to deal with are oily sheets after the application of an essential oil rub diluted in a carrier oil. (It makes a great deodorant too, but that’s another post.)

A quick note on absorption: Because Vitamin D, Vitamin B6, Vitamin B12, and a little calcium are essential for magnesium absorption, you’ll want to make sure your little one is getting adequate amounts of those as well. According to Kristen Michaelis’ book, Beautiful Babies, magnesium levels show more improvement when Vitamin D is obtained through sun exposure rather than oral supplements.

Essential Oils

Several essential oils are helpful for relaxation, and Plant Therapy (one of the essential oil companies I purchase from) even makes a Growing Pains blend. I’ve already shared with you a list of essential oils that are considered safe for children and general dilution guidelines, however for this recipe Clinical Aromatherapist Lea Harris recommends a higher than normal dilution ratio.

Lea, who is the founder of Using Essential Oils Safely and the Using Essential Oils Safely community on Facebook, suggests a 2% dilution for under 5 (or at least 1%) and then 3-5% for the over age 6 crowd.

In terms of specific essential oils, here are the ones I think are best for this recipe:

One more thing before we get to the recipe. While growing pains are a normal (though hopefully occasional) part of childhood, there are other possible causes of leg discomfort. According to the Mayo Clinic, you should consult “your child’s doctor if you’re concerned about your child’s leg pain or the pain is:

  • Persistent
  • Still present in the morning
  • Severe enough to interfere with your child’s normal activities
  • Located in the joints
  • Associated with an injury
  • Accompanied by other signs or symptoms, such as swelling, redness, tenderness, fever, limping, rash, loss of appetite, weakness or fatigue” (source)

 

This 2-ingredient recipe has been very helpful for my kids when they have growing pains. It's a magnesium oil rub with essential oils that support muscle relaxation. The dilution ratios - which are a bit higher than normal, were recommended to me by Clinical Aromatherapist Lea Harris, who is the founder of the Using Essential Oils Safely community.

DIY Magnesium Oil Rub For Achy Legs

This recipe can be easily cut in half or doubled depending on how often it is used.

Ingredients

To Make

Add magnesium oil and essential oils to a glass container and shake well to combine.

To Use

Massage on legs as needed.

Shelf Life

For essential oils blended with a carrier oil, the estimated shelf life is usually 6-12 months if kept in the fridge and 2-6 months at room temperature. I don’t know exactly what the shelf life of this formula is, but my guess is it’s about the same or a little less. I suggest making up only as much as you expect to use in a few months time.

Storage

Store in a cool, dark cabinet to prevent premature oxidation of the essential oils.

Want more research-backed natural remedies?

No problem, I’ve created a free ebook for you – Kitchen Apothecary: 25+ Natural Remedies Using Ingredients From Your Pantry – as a gift for signing up for my newsletter. You’ll also get updates when I post about safe essential oils for pregnant/breastfeeding mamas, exclusive gifts and coupons (I was able to give away a jar of free coconut oil to anyone who wanted it recently!), plus other goodies.

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Heather http://www.mommypotamus.com <![CDATA[3 Ingredient Watermelon Mint Popsicles]]> http://www.mommypotamus.com/?p=47765 2016-07-26T16:56:41Z 2016-07-26T16:43:02Z Watermelon is the official state vegetable of Oklahoma. Yes, I’m serious. (source) It’s also more or less the official fruit of late summer picnics, pool days, snack times and barbecues. How can both of these things be true? It’s simple. While watermelon is part of the cucumber and pumpkin family – Cucurbitaceae (Citrullus genus) – it’s also classified as […]

Continue Reading...3 Ingredient Watermelon Mint Popsicles

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watermelon-popsicles

Watermelon is the official state vegetable of Oklahoma. Yes, I’m serious. (source) It’s also more or less the official fruit of late summer picnics, pool days, snack times and barbecues.

How can both of these things be true? It’s simple. While watermelon is part of the cucumber and pumpkin family – Cucurbitaceae (Citrullus genus) – it’s also classified as a fruit. It contains more lycopene than a tomato and is completely edible . . . even the rind, which is sometimes pickled, candied or made into gazpacho. (source 1, source 2)

But I’m getting ahead of myself. The most basic fact about watermelons – the one everyone knows – is that the summer season is just not complete without them. In honor of National Watermelon Day, which is coming up next week on August 3rd, I thought I’d share this refreshing recipe for mint-infused watermelon popsicles.

Popsicles don’t get any easier than this, y’all. I hope you love them as much as we do!

(And psst! If you haven’t picked one up yet, here are some helpful tips for choosing a ripe watermelon.)

watermelon-popsicles-recipe

3 Ingredient Watermelon Mint Popsicles
 
This recipe makes approximately 24 fluid ounces, or 3 cups liquid. My popsicle molds hold ⅓ cup each, so this batch made 9 popsicles.
Author:
Ingredients
  • 6 cups cubed, de-seeded watermelon
  • 2 tablespoons maple syrup or honey
  • ¼ teaspoon peppermint extract
Instructions
  1. Place all ingredients in a blender and puree until smooth. Pour mixture in popsicle mold and freeze until solid.

 

Continue Reading...3 Ingredient Watermelon Mint Popsicles

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