How To Dye Easter Eggs Naturally With Everyday Ingredients

on March 26 | in Kid's Stuff | by | with 70 Comments

Want to skip Blue #2 and it's associated brain tumors year? You can still have beautiful, vibrantly colored eggs using items from your kitchen!

Hey mamas, it’s time to get YOUR basket out!

C’mon, you know you want to snap up brightly colored gems while little giggles and squeals surround you. And if a soft breeze wants to play with your hair in the golden sunshine? Well, so be it. Let your hubby, mom, or bestie handle the DSLR while you jump in the photos for once.

That’s what I’m planning to do at least, and then of course I’m going to chop up our jeweled treasures for Jenny’s pesto egg salad! (Note: You can use brown or white eggs with these dyes. They will turn out different but both versions are beautiful)

Yellow

IMG_1265 2

Two cups water plus 3/4 tablespoons turmeric creates this vibrant yellow on white eggs and a deep gold on brown ones. Other options: Orange or lemon peels, carrots, chamomile tea, celery seed, green tea, ground cumin, saffron

Pink

IMG_1306

Two cups water + two cups grated beets OR cranberries/ cranberry juice, raspberries, red grape juice or beet kvass (skip the vinegar for the kvass)

Orange

IMG_1257 2

Two cups yellow onion peels plus five cups water. Other options: Carrots or paprika

Green / Blue

IMG_1317 2`

Three cups tightly packed shredded cabbage plus enough water to cover one inch above shreds. Brown eggs will turn green and white eggs will turn blue. Other options for green include spinach leaves, fresh basil and liquid chlorophyll. (Grass clippings are supposed to work too but I tried it and the water turned brown)

Other options for blue include ½ cup blueberries plus 1½ cups water (pictured on the right) or purple grape juice.

IMG_1370-002

Rusty Red

IMG_1261-001

Three to four cups tightly packed red onion peels plus water to cover about one inch above. Other options: Rose hips, pomegranate juice, raspberries. If you’re using brown eggs beets will turn them maroon – while eggs will be pink)

IMG_1355

Ingredients/Tools Needed:

  • Natural dye materials (shredded beets, turmeric, etc)
  • Filtered water
  • 1 tablespoon vinegar per dye color
  • pots for simmering ingredients
  • mesh strainer
  • small bowls or mason jars (order mason jars here)
  • eggs
  • medium pot
  • coconut or olive oil (optional – for adding luster to eggs)

Directions For Making Dye

  1. I’ve included estimates for proportions based on the dyes I made, but if you’re using different ingredients here are a few rules of thumb: Use about ½ to ¾ cup of the natural dye ingredient per one cup of water (except spices . . . you’ll need a lot less!). The water should come to ½ – 1 inch above your dye material.
  2. Bring dye matter and water to a boil.* Turn heat down to low and simmer, covered, for 15-60 minutes until desired color is reached. Keep in mind that the eggs will be several shades lighter so it’s best to go for deep, rich hues.
  3. Remove from heat and let cool to room temperature
  4. Pour dye through a mesh strainer into bowls/mason jars and add 3 teaspoons of vinegar for each cup of dye liquid
  5. Add hardboiled eggs and place in fridge until desired color is reached (I started mine in early afternoon and let them set overnight)

If you’re using juice skip the boiling. Just add the vinegar and get started.

Directions For Eggs:

  1.  In a medium pot cover eggs in cold water.  Bring pot to a boil. Once it’s rolling turn off the heat and cover the pot, After 10 minutes, place eggs in a bowl of cold water and let sit until they’re cool to the touch.
  2. Drain bowl and replace with warm, soapy water (I used castille soap). Gently rub eggs with a washcloth or your thumb to remove oils that prohibit natural dyes from adhering as effectively to the egg shell.
  3. Lower egg into the dye and place them in the fridge. Soak until your desired color is reached.
  4. When the eggs are ready scoop them out with a spoon and place on a drying rack or an upside down egg carton.
  5. Naturally-dyed eggs have a matte finish. If you’d like to add a little lustre rub with coconut our olive oil and polish with a paper towel.

IMG_1370-1

Thank you Dr. Momma and Two Men & A Little Farm for inspiring this post!

Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...
STANDARD FTC DISCLOSURE: In order for me to support my blogging activities, I may receive monetary compensation or other types of remuneration for my endorsement, recommendation, testimonial and/or link to any products or services from this blog. Please note that I only ever endorse products that are in alignment with Mommypotamus' ideals and that I believe would be of value to my readers.
 

related posts

70 Responses to How To Dye Easter Eggs Naturally With Everyday Ingredients

  1. Meg Bailey Gustafson via FB says:

    have always wanted to do these. just so expensive,but like anything natural i guess. par for the course of health :)

  2. Jenny says:

    We do this every year and LOVE it. The only thing is that it can be tough to find white eggs that are pasture-raised in my area, and dying brown eggs just makes them a slightly different shade of brown. Still loads of fun.

  3. Meg Bailey Gustafson- I was worried about the cost too, but a deep blue dye made from blueberries only requires 1/2 cup and you can use scraps from yellow/red onion and less than a tablespoon of turmeric for other gorgeous hues. It’s not as cheap as Paas dye, but it’s definitely doable with a little planning!

  4. Wyndie Pereira Mileski via FB says:

    I love the way you staged the photos…they are so appealing! :)

  5. brittany says:

    So fun! Can’t wait to try this! J is 14 months so this is the first Easter that he’ll have fun with it!

  6. I was just telling my daughter, (as I was pouring some beet kvass) that her Great G-pa always used beets to color eggs!! This will be so fun! Thanks for sharing! Although, as we are preparing our dinners, one can save the onion peels or whatnot and keep adding to the certain color jar as you go up until Easter! That way you wont be going out to get EVERYTHING at once!

  7. Rochelle says:

    The natural colors look so much more vibrant and beautiful than store bought dyes! I was thinking about switching to natual dyes and just hadn’t looked up directions yet so thank you very much!

  8. LeeandMaia Forde via FB says:

    This sounds fun! I never dye eggs, but this sounds like a fun homeschool project! :D

  9. Claudia Ritter via FB says:

    So…kids can get brain tumors from dying eggs??

  10. Claudia Ritter – Well, probably not just from dyeing eggs, but we do avoid food dyes because of their strong link to brain and other cancers http://www.cspinet.org/fooddyes/

  11. Awww, thanks Wyndie Pereira Mileski!

  12. So true, Tonia Honer-Ophoven. I am saving my peels for the big day next week!

  13. They’ll love it, LeeandMaia Forde! Katie was so excited to eat them this morning, which I considered a nice side benefit :)

  14. Meg Bailey Gustafson via FB says:

    oooh, that’s not bad. i wasn”t sure how to get 2 c of onion peels ;)

  15. Natalie Premeaux Kemp via FB says:

    Thank you! I was just thinking about natural food coloring. :)

  16. LeeandMaia Forde via FB says:

    We love boiled eggs! I think the egg salad recipe you mentioned sounds amazing!!!

  17. Claudia Ritter via FB says:

    Don’t get me wrong – I was just reacting to the way that was presented. I choose natural over artificial, but usually not out of fearful reasons.

  18. Ok, I think it get it now Claudia Ritter.For what it’s worth, all I meant is that there are fun and vibrant dye alternatives to what we grew up with :)

  19. [...] I like to eat eggs, just not eggs tainted with the artificial food colorings that are linked to cancers and issues like hypersensitivity and ADHD. These dyes pass through the shell and onto the white of my egg, and thus into my body when consumed – not something I find desirable. Two years ago I stumbled upon a great alternative – natural dyes derived from vegetable and fruit sources from eco-kids. The colors are amazing. They are not the typical colors that the artificial dyes produce; these are deeper and more rustic. I always use brown eggs, so the colors really turn out neat on top of the brown. You can purchase these at the eco-kids website, or if you are a fellow Long Islander, at Healthy Alternatives in Babylon! You can also try your hand at making your own food dyes if you are up to the challenge – here are some recipes: Dyeing Easter Eggs Naturally and Mommypotamus Dyeing with Everyday Ingredients. [...]

  20. Dawn says:

    Love this – Just added the link to blog post I wrote here: Fun and Green(er) Easter ideas – http://www.mommypotamus.com/how-to-dye-easter-eggs-naturally-with-everyday-ingredients/

  21. Dawn says:

    here’s the right link! Love your natural dyeing egg ideas and shared your link here: http://raisingnaturalkids.com/2012/03/12/fun-and-greener-easter-ideas/

  22. My husband and I were just talking about trying to color eggs naturally with our 2-year-old, since this year she is old enough to dye eggs. Your post will save us lots of experimentation. Thanks:-)

  23. I love this idea! I’m thinking I’ll have to try these as easter gets closer. I stopped dying eggs years ago and haven’t tried natural dying. I must give this a try now that I have a little toddler running around.

  24. LOVES THIS! Beautiful pictures, great suggestions, woo hoo! Thanks Heather :)

  25. [...] How to Dye Easter Eggs Naturally With Everyday Ingredients, by Mommypotamus. [...]

  26. [...] started planning for the magic of spring at Easter-time with visits from family, naturally dyed eggs and homemade, natural [...]

  27. The colors are so much more beautiful than the neon colors from the tabs : )

    I can’t wait to try my own this year!

  28. [...] the subject here, and here, and found the most useful reference guide and instructions over here at Mommypotomus. Then I jumped in – it was my Spring break [...]

  29. Elisabeth M says:

    Wow!!! I am inspired.

  30. Rebekah says:

    The turmeric and cabbage dyes worked out great! The cranberry juice, not so much. Oh well :)

  31. [...] But Mommypotamus (I always struggle with spelling that!) has you covered with a post on How To Dye Easter Eggs Naturally With Everyday Ingredients! [...]

  32. Barbra Konrad says:

    Tried this today! The beets (pink) and turmeric (yellow) worked great! The carrots, not so much. I think I may have added too much water. Also, the stink from the cabbage was unbearable… I don’t think I will try it with cabbage again. It was such a fun project though! My kids (and husband) loved it! Well worth it!

    • Heather says:

      Oh, so glad you liked it, Barbra! I must say I didn’t notice the cabbage smell, but we’ve always go so many experiments going on in our kitchen I think I’m desensitized now :)

  33. [...] Natural Products- Natural Egg Dyeing Natural Egg Dyeing by Martha Stewart  How to Dye Easter Eggs Naturally by Mommypotamus  Jo’s Health Corner  Linked up at: Deep Roots at Home A Wise Woman Builds Her [...]

  34. [...] There is A LOT of wiggle room for this part, so have fun and experiment! To get started, just put your veggies/fruits in a pot of filtered water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 10-40 minutes depending on how intense you want the color to be. For spices, just warm the water up and mix until dissolved. Here are some natural dye suggestions I grabbed from my post on naturally dyed Easter eggs. [...]

  35. [...] There is A LOT of wiggle room for this part, so have fun and experiment! To get started making your own play dough dye, just put veggies/fruits in a pot of filtered water and bring to a boil. Simmer for 10-40 minutes depending on how intense you want the color to be. For spices, just warm the water up and mix until dissolved. Here are some color ideas I grabbed from my post on naturally dyed Easter eggs. [...]

  36. [...] How to Dye Easter Eggs Naturally with Everyday Ingredients [...]

  37. [...] this post by Mommypotamus on natural easter egg dyes for a fun weekend project with some kiddos I [...]

  38. [...] is perfect for the upcoming Easter holiday.  No more gross artificial egg dyes!  Learn to dye your eggs naturally with everyday [...]

  39. [...] I like to eat eggs, just not eggs tainted with the artificial food colorings that are linked to cancers and issues like hypersensitivity and ADHD. These dyes pass through the shell and onto the white of my egg, and thus into my body when consumed – not something I find desirable. Two years ago I stumbled upon a great alternative – natural dyes derived from vegetable and fruit sources from eco-kids. The colors are amazing. They are not the typical colors that the artificial dyes produce; these are deeper and more rustic. I always use brown eggs, so the colors really turn out neat on top of the brown. You can purchase these at the eco-kids website, on Amazon, at many Williams-Sonoma stores or if you are a fellow Long Islander, at Healthy Alternatives in Babylon! You can also try your hand at making your own food dyes if you are up to the challenge – here are some recipes: Dyeing Easter Eggs Naturally,  Easter Eggs: Dye ‘Em Naturally so You Can Eat ‘Em Too and from Mommypotamus, Dyeing with Everyday Ingredients. [...]

  40. [...]  I have found some amazing natural egg coloring suggestions online, like this awesome post from Mommypotamus and the color suggestions below from PositiveMed. Here is a list of many natural color sources [...]

  41. Such a great post, Heather! I’m sharing it on my real food meal plan over at The Better Mom! Hope this sends many new friends your way! Lots of blessings to you for a Happy Good Friday and Easter Sunday, Kelly

  42. Oh rad! I love these ideas, I’m sure you can use most of these natural items for dying food too. I shared this post on my Facebook. : )

  43. Lindsey says:

    Slightly off topic.. I’m going to use a similar method to dye some scarves I’m making, and wondering how I could accomplish a grey color. Activated charcoal maybe?

  44. [...] your child taste what­ever edi­ble is being used as a dye. Fol­low these instruc­tions from Mom­my­pota­mus, which involve soak­ing the eggs for a few hours or overnight. Or, you can try this faster [...]

  45. [...] out my Nashville friend Mommypotamus natural Easter egg dyeing post with easy to find everyday [...]

  46. Leah G says:

    Finally worked up the courage to dye eggs with my 17mo and 3 yo. WOW I dont remember the chemical dyes even being so vibrant. I love the purple from the beet kvass, blue from the red cabbage, yellow from turmeric, and orange from yellow onions. The only duds we had were grape juice and spirulina.

  47. [...] How To Dye Easter Eggs Naturally With Everyday Ingredients « The Mommypotamus [...]

  48. [...] for Easter, you’ll need to soak the eggs much longer than with the store bought kits – see how here.  But the payoff to your time and experimentation will be festively colorful food without a toxic [...]

  49. [...] for my three chosen colors. For future egg dying projects, I also found some great information here and here. I really like the look of the naturally dyed eggs and how the colors are more subtle and [...]

  50. Margaret says:

    I just did mine, and turmeric and red cabbage together make a pretty green, even though the dye looks just kind of maroon when you mix them. I also tried to get red with cranberries and it did not make them red, instead they became speckled gray.

  51. Kelly says:

    Oh I love how your dark grape colored ones turned out! I didn’t do blueberries this year but I was happy with my rainbow from the turmeric, beets, onions and cabbage. :)

  52. [...] with coloring them with natural materials.  I found some blog posts about techniques here and here.  Please check out those sites for [...]

  53. […] An even better alternative is to try your hand at making your own food dyes if you are up to the challenge – just know that some of the homemade dyes have to be made at least 1 day in advance and some of them require you to sit the egg in the dye for 24 hours in order to get a bright color. Here are some recipes: Dyeing Easter Eggs Naturally,  Easter Eggs: Dye ‘Em Naturally so You Can Eat ‘Em Too and from Mommypotamus, Dyeing with Everyday Ingredients. […]

  54. Leah Hughes via FB says:

    Kim Bruizeman Weller, looks good!

  55. Kim Bruizeman Weller via FB says:

    Thanks Leah Hughes…love these ideas!!

  56. Shannon Hayden Cooper via FB says:

    Mariya Kudyakova, April Shaner, Stefani Williamson Gentry This is just what we were talking about the other night!

  57. […] As you start planning for Easter, you will want to check out the options for dyeing eggs with household ingredients. […]

  58. […] and Ideas: Frontier Natural Products- Natural Egg Dyeing Natural Egg Dyeing by Martha Stewart How to Dye Easter Eggs Naturally by Mommypotamus Jo’s Health Corner Linked up at: Deep Roots at Home A Wise Woman Builds Her House Far Above […]

  59. […] We’ll also experiment by putting some of this natural dye into water, mixed with vinegar and water. For more details on naturally dyeing eggs, check out this Mommypotamus post. […]

  60. […] Beyond Sick of just dyeing your eggs brown? Here’s a list of different colors and how to make the dyes naturally using cranberry juice, cabbage, turmeric, etc. Go […]

  61. […] a few things differently next time around! First, I’d follow some legitimate directions :). Mommypotamus got it right, her naturally brewed dyes are super vibrant! And second, I wouldn’t dip my […]

  62. […] a good link for the natural egg dye, by MommyPotamus: http://www.mommypotamus.com/how-to-dye-easter-eggs-naturally-with-everyday-ingredients/. I bought these bunny egg holders to dip the eggs in the dye (see the picture to the right of […]

  63. […] forget about a good, old-fashioned Easter egg hunt!  Start with pastured eggs, dye them naturally with everyday ingredients, and it will make for a healthy–and memorable– occasion from start to […]

  64. […] found a helpful blog post from Mommypotamus with step-by-step instructions and pictures of what each natural dye will look […]

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

You may use these HTML tags and attributes: <a href="" title=""> <abbr title=""> <acronym title=""> <b> <blockquote cite=""> <cite> <code> <del datetime=""> <em> <i> <q cite=""> <strike> <strong>

« »