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Homemade Mint Extract Recipe

on June 12 | in Recipes | by | with 45 Comments

Mint Extract Recipe - Ohhh, I'm going to add a minty twist to my favorite brownies, chocolate pudding, ice cream, hot chocolate or tea! This two-ingredient mint extract recipe looks so easy.

Want to add a cool, minty twist . . .

To your favorite brownies AND save your family money, too? With this two-ingredient mint extract recipe, those goals are done and DONE. Just five minutes of hands-on time plus a little time for the extract to “ripen,” and you ‘ll be be stirring it into hot chocolate, tea, chocolate mousse, ice cream, peppermint pattiesmarshmallows and whatever else your heart desires.

It also makes an inexpensive, beautiful gift for the foodies in your life.

Saving Analysis

Store-bought mint extract costs an average of $1.95 per ounce. Here’s the breakdown for this recipe:

  • Spirits – I used vodka for this batch. My cost was $0.49/ounce
  • Organic mint leaves  (peppermint, chocolate mint, spearmint)– $1.99 per bunch at my local farmers market.

Total store bought cost – About $23.40 for 12 ounces

Total homemade cost – About $7.87 for 12 ounces

Mint Extract Recipe - Ohhh, I'm going to add a minty twist to my favorite brownies, chocolate pudding, ice cream, hot chocolate or tea! This two-ingredient mint extract recipe looks so easy.

A Note On Ingredients

The main spirits used to make mint extract – vodka and bourbon – are now often made from GMO-plants and/or enzymes derived from genetically modified organisms. (source) Rum is sometimes used as well, though I was unable to find a definitive answer on whether it is likely to have GMO origins. Manufacturers claim that “none of the genetic material makes it through the distilling process to the final product,” but to my knowledge that has not been independently verified. (source)

In a report on Kentucky bourbon and GMO’s, Grist.com author Twilight Greenaway writes:

“This question of the genetic material passing through the distillation process came up repeatedly while I was researching the issue, and while it’s an important one, the fact is that neither Brown-Forman, nor the Kentucky Distillers Association (KDA), nor The Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau (TTB) have made any scientific research public that proves their point. The KDA did not respond to my inquiries either.)” (source)

Organic options are hard to find, but there are certain sources that are still likely to be GMO-free. If you’re looking for vodka, here’s one optionThis one looks good, too. Bourbon is a little more tricky. There are brands that still strive to be GMO-free, but due to the fact that the corn used is grown in the United States cross-contamination may be an issue.

Rum, which is derived from sugarcane, would not contain GMO’s unless they come from enzymes used in the fermentation process. I was not able to find any data on manufacturing processes either way, but fortunately there are a few organic options if you’d like to go this route.

Mint Extract Recipe

Ingredients

  • 1 cup mint leaves, de-stemmed
  • 1 ½ cups vodka, bourbon, or rum

Instructions

1. Wash leaves and pat dry.

Mint Extract Recipe - Mint Extract Recipe - Ohhh, I'm going to add a minty twist to my favorite brownies, chocolate pudding, ice cream, hot chocolate or tea! This two-ingredient mint extract recipe looks so easy.

2. Remove leaves from stem and set aside.

Mint Extract Recipe - Mint Extract Recipe - Ohhh, I'm going to add a minty twist to my favorite brownies, chocolate pudding, ice cream, hot chocolate or tea! This two-ingredient mint extract recipe looks so easy.

3. Place leaves in a jar and mash them lightly so they will release their oils.

Mint Extract Recipe - Mint Extract Recipe - Ohhh, I'm going to add a minty twist to my favorite brownies, chocolate pudding, ice cream, hot chocolate or tea! This two-ingredient mint extract recipe looks so easy.

4. Pour alcohol over the leaves. Using a spoon, mash leaves down until completely covered.

mint extract recipe -  Mint Extract Recipe - Ohhh, I'm going to add a minty twist to my favorite brownies, chocolate pudding, ice cream, hot chocolate or tea! This two-ingredient mint extract recipe looks so easy.

5. Cover jar with a tight-fitting lid and store in a dark cabinet for 3-4 week, shaking occasionally. When the extract has reached the depth of flavor that you prefer, strain the the leaves from the extract. Store extract in either a dark container or in a dark cabinet.

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45 Responses to Homemade Mint Extract Recipe

  1. Love this idea and thanks for linking to my Peppermint Patties! :)

  2. Noelle says:

    this is so great! thanks! funny question: could you use this same method to make other flavors? I am trying so hard to find a way to recreate cucumber melon and can’t find anything and wondered if I used this same method if it might work!

    • Gudrun B says:

      i have added cucumber pieces to vodka already and the more you put in the more cucumber flavor! try a small batch and see how it turns out with melon and cucumber?

    • Laura says:

      We love to make Strawberry infused Vodka, and I have to say, it’s “consistently” amazing! Taking about two pints of strawberries, cut off the green tops, and then slice the berry in half. If the berry is huge, you can quarter it. Then put the berries in a pitcher and cover with vodka. Use a nice 5 or 6 times distilled Vodka, but it doesn’t have to expensive. We like using Skye vodka, and it makes a great combo. So let it sit for AT LEAST five hours or overnight. The longer it sits, the better the vodka tastes. You will be so surprised at how yummy and summery the vodka is. You can just mix it with ice and mineral water, and yummy! Then, to make things even more exciting, you can put a couple of strawberries in the cocktails…when you pop them in your mouth and eat them, wow wow wow, mini yummy vodka shots. We really never have a summer party without Strawberry Vodka!

  3. Grace says:

    This is such a great idea! Once strained, how long will it stay good? Its alcohol so a while right?

  4. Terah says:

    Hi! I made some minty vanilla in a very similar way and tucked it back in the cupboard and just found it again the other day…it’s been a year! :( Do you think it’s still safe to use? I never strained off the leaves…

  5. Gudrun B says:

    i am wondering if putting all in the blender and giving it a really short turn would help extract more oils – would any one know???

    • Amanda @ Mommypotamus Support says:

      Gudrun, It would help extract the oils more quickly, but your final extract may have tiny bits of leaves floating throughout if it blends too much. A fine mesh strainer might solve that problem, though.

    • SusanH says:

      The technique used here to make the mint extract is actually the same as would be used to tincture herbs and other plant materials for medicine-making. In that case, most herbalists do use a blender to chop the herbs prior to pouring the menstruum (spirits) over the plant material. You would strain this after a few weeks first through a fine mesh strainer, then through a coffee filter, or a piece of muslin, something like that. Kept in a dark cabinet, tinctures — and this mint extract — should keep for several years, unless you gobble it down quickly in all it’s deliciousness. A non-alcoholic version can be made with food-grade glycerin. Good luck!

  6. Astrid says:

    This is how you make tinctures/herbal extracts for anything, with fresh leaves you will have the best extraction and shelf life from 100% Alcohol. You could then dilute it for your use by adding water, ( if you needed 1 tsp you would add 1/2 of the extract and 1/2 of water. Yes you could still use it if you made it a year ago and forgot to strain it as long as the alcohol content is high enough at least 50% but double check that there is no mold or anything of the sort. And yes blending in the blender will also assist with extraction due to more surface area to extract from :) Have fun !!!

  7. Christene says:

    I’ve been doing my own extracts for years but my favorite is my mint. I make it using mint leaves I pick myself here in the Austrian alps. Yes, I am a lucky girl, I realize most don’t have this option. :)

  8. m.s. says:

    Any non alcohol options…

  9. Nicole says:

    Is there a way to make a non-alcoholic version?

    • Scherri says:

      Vegetable glycerin is used as an alternative when making herbal extracts, I don’t see why you can’t use it instead. However with that said, you should do some research on the process of glycerin as the medium instead of alcohol. I have to think that if you are using glycerin the mint leaves should be dry not fresh.

  10. Nancy says:

    RAIN vodka is certified organic !

  11. Debbie says:

    Rain makes organic vodka, which is what I use to make my homemade extracts.

  12. Linda says:

    Do you think traditional rye whiskey would work (it’s colorless)? We live next to a distillery that makes small batch whiskey using locally-sourced grains (organic), and was thinking local mint + local whiskey = extra goodness!

  13. Jessica says:

    I’m wondering, would you make orange extract in a similar fashion?

    • Gudrun B says:

      interesting! once i get organic oranges again i might try lots of shredded orange peel in some vodka!
      I need a bigger kitchen – with a back room fermentation/extraction/brewing station :)

  14. neil almero says:

    can i use virgin coconut oil instead of vodka or other alcoholic beverages?

    • Gudrun B says:

      Neil Almero, NO – you have heard that oil and water do not mix well, so the leaves contain water and mixed with oil it will most likely turn into a mess, grow mold or be unusable
      what do you want the mint for with oil? you might be able to do it with dried mint leaves, but it will be a crumbly thing
      if it is the mint flavor try brewing a very strong tea – it has a short shelf life, but kept in the refrigerator may be 2 weeks; or freeze the strong brew in ice cube trays ( 6 months should be OK for that – store in closed container after the cubes have frozen)

  15. […] Homemade Mint Extract from Mommypotamus […]

  16. Beth says:

    Excellent timing.
    I have a bottle of rum that we aren’t drinking, and some mint growing in the back yard.
    Win-Win!

  17. lisa says:

    Can this be stored in the fridge?

  18. carole says:

    I’m trying this for the first time. It’s been up in the cupboard for about a week and the leaves are turning brown and so is the vodka. Is this what’s supposed to happen?

  19. […] Mint Extract RecipeThe Mommypotamus | […]

  20. Linda says:

    Just made a batch, can’t wait to see how it turns out!!

  21. […] is acetone-free, I did not do this test. Perhaps the vodka I keep on hand for making vanilla and mint extract – I’m not sure. Also, glass will not be affected by the alcohol test, but it will fail […]

  22. Janae says:

    Hi! So excited to make this. I have a big chocolate mint plant that I’ve been trying to find things to do with. Question, if I use Rum, is it okay if it’s Spiced Rum? Captain Morgan, to be specific. Thank you!

  23. […] homemade mint and vanilla extracts, it also makes a beautiful gift for the foodies in your […]

  24. Keith Miller says:

    Will this extract work well to make ice tea or hot tea months later

  25. deb white says:

    ??? how about Rose hips I have an over abundance of them this year and was wondering if I would be able to use them to do this.

    • Mike says:

      Personally, if you have so many, and you have the patience I’d make rose hip wine. It does take about 5 years to age so patience is a must. But there is no reason you can’t use them in this extract recipe. You’d probably want to bruise them thoroughly first though.

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