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Thin n’ Crispy Pizza Crust – Made with Soaked Grains

on March 28 | in Recipes | by | with 13 Comments

This recipe was adapted from Sugar and Spice, which was adapted from Cooking Light December 2007. The only change I made was to incorporate Nourishing Traditions-style soaked grains. Thank you Stephanie for passing this along. It’s our favorite crust ever!

YIELD: 3-4 Servings

PREP: 15 mins

COOK: 20 mins

READY IN: 24 hrs 35 mins

This recipe was adapted from Sugar and Spice, which was adapted from Cooking Light December 2007. The only change I made was to …

Ingredients

    • 3 1/4 cups whole wheat flour
    • 1 cup warm water
    • 2 tbsp whey, lemon juice, or apple cider vinegar
    • 2 tbsp raw honey 
    • 4 1/2 tsp instant yeast (or activated yeast)
    • 1/2 tsp sea salt
    • 4 tsp yellow cornmeal 

Instructions

  1. On the night before you want to serve pizza, combine the warm water, lemon juice/whey, and whole wheat flour. Cover and leave on counter for 12-24 hours.
  2. Next day, add raw honey, instant yeast, and sea salt.
  3. Knead on a well-floured surface for 10 min, adding flour as needed to keep dough from sticking to hands. Lightly cover with oil and place in a warm area for 1 hr to rise (an oven heated to 150-170 and then turned off is perfect).
  4. Once the dough has risen, remove from oven and preheat oven to 450 degrees.
  5. Punch dough down; cover and let rest 5 minutes.
  6. Separate into two balls. Roll first ball of dough into a 14-inch circle on a lightly floured surface.
  7. Place dough on a pizza stone or baking sheet sprinkled with cornmeal.
  8. Repeat process with second half of dough.
  9. Drizzle dough with a little olive oil and sprinkle with a pinch of salt.
  10. Place pan on lowest oven rack; bake at 450 for 10 minutes or until golden brown. Remove from oven; top with desired toppings and bake an additional 10 minutes or until crust and cheese is lightly browned.

CUISINE: Italian
COURSE: Entrée
SKILL LEVEL: Beginner

If you like a thicker crust, try my other soaked grain pizza dough.

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13 Responses to Thin n’ Crispy Pizza Crust – Made with Soaked Grains

  1. Meredith says:

    Ummm…yumm-o.
    .-= Meredith´s last blog ..Down on the Farm =-.

  2. Stephanie says:

    You are awesome, Heather!!! Thank you, and I am glad you all like it so much. I can’t wait to try it out this week.
    .-= Stephanie´s last blog ..Two Months =-.

  3. [...] Pepperoni and Pineapple Pizza – Using our brand-new Thin N’ Crispy Pizza Crust! [...]

  4. [...] not with this recipe (I use our Thin N’ Crispy Pizza Crust made with soaked grains), but c’mon . . . I’ve been doing this for awhile and this was [...]

  5. ashley says:

    Heather,
    If I am going to freeze some of it, at what point do I stop and freeze? Before letting it rise or after?

    Ash

  6. Chelsea says:

    This looks lovely. I just want to check that the extra 1/2 to 1 cup of flour to dust the benchtops?
    :-)

  7. Heather says:

    Chelsea – I’m not quite sure what you mean. Please clarify.

  8. Leslie says:

    This is the best whole grain pizza crust recipe I’ve found. Thank you!

  9. Tammy Rich says:

    I know this is an old posting, but I’m wondering if i could use this crust dough to make the Chicken and Vegetable Turnover recipe – instead of the Einkorn Crust?…I’m a little bit overwhelmed by the sourdough einkorn crust recipe…:-)

  10. After reading warnings to stay away from some ingredients with the word “yeast” in them, that hide MSG, I’m a little confused about yeast as an ingredient. I want to make some breads that call for “an envelope of yeast,” and you mention instant or activated yeast here too. (I’m admittedly new to ever making my own breads before.)

    I would appreciate any help sorting out what’s ok to use, and when yeast is a good thing and when it’s not. Or a simple direction to a safe bread yeast product to buy, if you don’t have the time to spell it all out for me otherwise. : )
    Thank you much!

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